Tallinn

All the major landmarks are within close proximity to each other, without the need for taxis and public transport. Tallinn is the most delightful and well preserved medieval city one could hope to visit and explore on a city breaks holiday. The capital has more historical sites and surprises than anywhere else in the Baltic States.

The Old Town of Tallinn has two distinct parts, one part built on a hill called Toompea - this was home to the gentry, and the other part Lower Town, once an autonomous town, at the base of Toompea on the flat. A climb up Toompea Hill is rewarded with glorious views across the Bay of Tallinn and the Lower Town red-tiled roofs. Most of Tallinn's dining, nightlife and shopping is concentrated in and around the Lower Town, and the Old Town's main gathering place, Town Hall Square, plays host to frequent concerts and outdoor markets.

Tallinn today contains lots of influence from those days but still manages to retain an Estonian soul and identity. This is not a huge capital, just about 400 000 inhabitants, but it has it all. A very rich cultural and pleasant atmosphere and many interesting sights yet to be explored.

The other side of the coin is an important Baltic seaport and a modern city with extra ordinary telecom and Internet solutions. A place for business in the 21st century. Add innumerable diverse cultural events, bargain shopping, five star or budget hotels and a pulsing nightlife and you have a city that is a must to visit when you are in the Baltic Region.

12 things to see in Tallinn

Dominican monastery and St.Catherine's passage

A truly ancient highlight within the Old Town district, St. Catherine's Passage is an important passageway. On the northern side of the passage itself, historic remains of St. Catherine's Church are still available. The summer of 1995 saw St. Catherine's Passage being truly rediscovered and gaining newfound popularity. Attractions include many buildings from the 15th, 16th and 17th centuries, along with artisan studios and galleries, where artists can be observed creating their masterpieces.

Town Hall square

The square is the centre piece of Tallinn's Old Town and has a long and fascinating history. Once a place for public executions (72 in one day in 1806), it's now where Finnish day-trippers and Tallinn city breaks explorers come to enjoy fine restaurants and a relaxing drink. In summer, the entire length and breadth of town hall square buzzes with open-air cafes and bars and all around the squares peripheries exciting places can be discovered along the endless cobblestoned pavements. Central to the square is the Town Hall, built in the early 1200s and is a major focal point of the city and a must-see short breaks tourist attractions in Tallinn. It's the only late gothic building still intact in Estonia and both its interiors and exteriors are very impressive. There are exhibitions to be found in the basement level of the town hall and the attic. Occasionally, holiday visitors can gain access to the top of the spire, which is great place to take some wonderful panoramic photographs of the old town. In the northeast corner of the Town hall square is one of the world's oldest functioning drug stores, the Town Council Pharmacy, which opened in 1422.

St Nicholas Church

is home to the museum of medieval art and inside hangs the painting 'Dance of Death' by Berndt Notke. Exquisite altarpieces, baroque chandeliers and medieval burial slabs are also on display, while the Silver Chamber is home to stunning works by members of town's craft guilds. St Nicholas, is architecturally one of the most integral and harmonious medieval churches in Estonia. Its history goes back to the 13th century, founded around 1230 by German merchants. The building's acoustics also make it a prime concert venue, with organ or choir performances held here most weekends.

The Great Guild Hall

has played a significant role in the cities life throughout the past centuries. This building was the gathering place for the rich merchants of the town, to discuss and direct economic and political agendas. Its members, who were exclusively married German merchants, were the only citizens allowed to serve on the Town Council, and the mayor was chosen from their ranks.
The building itself dates to 1410, but the ornate, lion's head knockers on its doors were added in 1430. Today the Great Guild Hall houses the Estonian History Museum and has many attractive exhibitions for citybreak travellers to enjoy.

Medieval city wall

The remains of the ancient City Walls feature a number of imposing towers, which date from the 16th century. Named as Kuldjala, Nunna and Sauna, these towers are amongst the oldest of the towers and are open to the public, providing impressive views across the cityscape, particularly through the small arrow slits (loopholes). Today, the defensive wall ringing the old city is the town's most striking feature and while Riga and Vilnius's walls were destroyed, 80 percent of the original 2.35km long wall around the Estonian capital is still intact. These picturesque constructions are the framework of the Old Town and offer a great walking route for keen Tallinn sightseeing explorers.

Dome Church, this grand architectural structure was the burial site of Swedish and German noblemen. The Dome Church (Toomkirik) was the religious centre for Baltic German communities. It's still the main Lutheran church and services can be attended. It's a beautiful Gothic building, certainly worth viewing and especially worth seeing is the Dome Church organ. The church organ is the largest and the most powerful organ in Estonia and is a marvellous tourist attraction to find in Tallinn. It was built in 1878 by an organ builder from Germany and is a mixture of Classicism and late Romanticism.

Toompea Castle which is home to the Estonia parliament is a national landmark and a popular 'what to see' attraction. The castle complex is made up of several parts: the west wall and the Tall Hermann tower belong to the medieval fortress of the Order of the Brothers of the Sword, the Government Administration building represents the Czarist era and is classic in style, and the building of the Riigikogu, in the castle courtyard, was built in the beginning of the 1920s. Toompea Castle offers visitors an afternoon of interesting sites, art, history and culture. We highly recommend this holiday hot spot. The Oldest part of the city is Toompea Hill, where the Danes decided to build their fort in the 13th century. Today, the Toompea area is more commonly known as 'upper old town' and has some of the most wonderful viewing platforms.

Kadriorg Palace and park

Magnificent northern baroque palace, built by Russian Tsar Peter the Great for his wife, Catherine I, in 1718. Designed by Italian architect Niccolo Michetti, the grandiose palace and surrounding manicured gardens are a humbling example of Tsarist extravagance, but just as important a reason to visit is that this is also home to the foreign art collection of the Art Museum of Estonia. The Kadriorg Art Museum displays hundreds of 16th- to 20th-century paintings by Western and Russian artists, as well as prints, sculptures and other works.

KUMU art museum

Holding Estonian art from different eras, it is naturally a magnet for every visitor interested in Estonian culture. The immense, hightech facility serves both as a national gallery, displaying the classics of Estonian art, and as a contemporary art museum, showing off the latest trends.
The 2008 European Museum of the Year Award was given to Kumu Art Museum.

Maritime museum in seaplane hangars

The seaplane hangars are a shining example of a contemporary reincarnation – a huge and fascinating building with an exceptional history and a great location that is still waiting for the revitalization of the surrounding area – open space that can accommodate a variety of different scenarios and activities.The hangars were designed to host the largest seaplanes of the time. This is the first known reinforced concrete shell structure of such a large scale in the world. During the Soviet era, the hangars were in the possession of the army, and since they were not maintained or repaired, they were essentially collapsing by the beginning of the 21st century. A spectacular space already existed at the seaplane hangars – the three joined domes forming a single undivided space is the most powerful element in the interior of the Maritime Museum. The museum is conventionally divided into three levels – exhibits underwater, on the water and in the air above the water. At the heart of the exhibition visitors can see a submarine dating from 1937 and a one-of-a-kind seaplane that has been rebuilt according to drawings dating from the beginning of the 20th century. Light, or rather its absence plays a major role – normally the interior is dark and the exhibits are illuminated, but once every hour the huge metal shutters on the floor-to-ceiling windows rise to let in daylight.The museum has become a huge success. Only during the Tallinn Maritime Days in July last year 15 200 people visited The Seaplane Harbour ́s hangars.

The museum has become a huge success. Only during the Tallinn Maritime Days in July last year 15 200 people visited The Seaplane Harbour ́s hangars. 

Kiek in de Kök Tower and Bastion tunnels

The tower Kiek in de Kök together with the tunnels of the Ingrian and Swedish bastions is an exciting part of Tallinn historical fortifications. The exhibition of "Kiek in de Kök and Bastion Passages" reopened in March 2010, it takes the visitor to a time journey that begins in 1219 and offers experience, information and entertainment. With the help of innovative video- and sound-effects and means of multimedia the birth and evolution of Tallinn, the history of town fortifications and the most significant military events are introduced to the visitor. The main part of the tunnel display- inside the Ingrian Bastion - concentrates on the history of the passages. In a short tunnel that leads to the Swedish bastion, the time train takes the tourist to 2219. The cafe on the uppermost floor of the tower offers magnificent views of the upper town Toompea, the lower town and the harbour.Defense tower Kiek in de Kök and Bastion tunnels 

The tower Kiek in de Kök together with the tunnels of the Ingrian and Swedish bastions is an exciting part of Tallinn historical fortifications. The exhibition of "Kiek in de Kök and Bastion Passages" reopened in March 2010, it takes the visitor to a time journey that begins in 1219 and offers experience, information and entertainment. With the help of innovative video- and sound-effects and means of multimedia the birth and evolution of Tallinn, the history of town fortifications and the most significant military events are introduced to the visitor. The main part of the tunnel display- inside the Ingrian Bastion - concentrates on the history of the passages. In a short tunnel that leads to the Swedish bastion, the time train takes the tourist to 2219. The cafe on the uppermost floor of the tower offers magnificent views of the upper town Toompea, the lower town and the harbour. 

 

City break offer for 2 persons including accommodation in dbl room for 2 nights, transfer in and out, guided walking tour (price per person starting from)

3* hotel 145 EUR p.p.

4* hotel 160 EUR p.p.

5* hotel 190 EUR p.p.

View from Upper Town
View from Upper Town
Cafe in Old Town
Cafe in Old Town
Lower Town
Lower Town
Dome Cathedral
Dome Cathedral
St.Catherine's passage
St.Catherine's passage
Town Hall square
Town Hall square
Flower festival
Flower festival
KUMU art museum
KUMU art museum
Tallinn city wall
Tallinn city wall
St.Nicholas church
St.Nicholas church
Sunset on Tallinn bay
Sunset on Tallinn bay
Winter in Kadriorg
Winter in Kadriorg
Kadriorg park
Kadriorg park
Rotermann quarter
Rotermann quarter
Yachts on Tallinn bay
Yachts on Tallinn bay
Seaplane hangars
Seaplane hangars
Kiek in de Kök
Kiek in de Kök


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